Wedding Planning Advice: A Guide to Postponing Your Wedding During COVID-19

The Met Gala, the Olympic Games, and the Pride Parade, all have one thing major thing in common—they’ve all been canceled. You know what is not cancelled? YOUR wedding! That’s right, your wedding day is not cancelled because it will happen whenever you both decide it get married.

As you know both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) including local and state governments has strict restrictions on social gatherings, and we are all to limit group gatherings because of COVID-19.

With so many unknowns and things changing so quickly around the globe, here in our nation, and locally in our area, DC metro area, there is no guarantee when we will all be allowed to freely gather in large groups even after June 10th. As a result, some couples are either postponing their weddings or considering alternative options, like private vow ceremonies and larger reception at a future date.

Wedding Planning Tips by Always Creating Studio Weddings & Events
Are you one of the couples thinking about postponing your wedding?

Making the decision to reschedule or postpone your wedding is not easy at all. It’s a painful and sad reality that I have been through with quite a few of my couples. Ultimately, the decision is one that brings some level of peace of mind given all the chaos and as I said earlier, unknowns.

Things to keep in mind for before postponing your wedding:

1. Reach out to your vendors first

As you reach out, keep in mind that your vendors are business owners and a postponement will impact them, as well. Please understand that each vendor will apply his/her own policies and guidelines when it comes to their contract.

And although I cannot speak for any of the vendors, I can tell you this, every single vendor will work together to find the best possible solution for all parties. Be polite and professional as you explain your situation, concerns, and request for their specific guidance. I recommend an initial email to the vendors directly then schedule a one-on-one call or video chat to discuss in detail your specific contract. Pull in your wedding planner to help you negotiate new terms, if needed.

2. Talk to your family and wedding party

As difficult as the decision to postpone your wedding it can be even more difficult to break the news to your closest family and friends. After you have consulted with your vendors, selected a new date, It is important to break the news to your family and wedding party immediately. You know your family and friends the best so find the best way to break the news to them, gently. As long as you share in a loving way they will understand.

3. Let your guests know immediately

Update your wedding website or send a change date card. If you have hotel room block, make it convenient on your guests by providing them with the name, email, and direct phone number of your hotel room block point of contact instead of the hotel’s general 800 number.

Wedding Planning Tips by Always Creating Studio Weddings & Events

4. Consider a vow ceremony and celebrate your reception at a later date

Large events and mass gatherings can contribute to the spread of COVID-19 especially with out of town guest travelers who will attend your wedding and then introduce the virus to new communities. And I don’t know about you, but with everyone chomping at the bits to get back to normal, this would be an unnecessary risk that can absolutely be avoided.

Postponing your wedding means you may need to make some tough choices and have uncomfortable decisions. Just keep in mind that not all of your vendors will be available on your new date, so please, before you change your date, be sure to clear the new date with all of your booked vendors—just because your venue can make it work does not mean that your photographer, florist, or caterer will be available.

Keep in mind that with a new date you may have to book a new vendor or two, which may result in a lost deposit. Be fair and polite when negotiating your old contract, or work with your wedding planner to negotiate on your behalf.

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